Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

GCLS – African American Genealogy Workshop

African American Genealogy Workshop

Date: Feb 28, 2015
Location: GCLS Main Library Meeting Rooms
Time: 10-12:30pm

Call 242-500 ext 2169 to register.

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Greenville’s Steel Magnolias

Explore the lives of some of the women who played a role, large or small, in the history and development of Greenville County, our state and our country in this two part series. Discover women of courage, intelligence, talent, resolve and brilliance including Dicey Langston, Mary Putnam Gridley, Hattie Duckett, Trude Heller, and more. Registration required – call 527-9261.

Part 1

Date: Tuesday – March 10 2015
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location: Main Library – Meeting Room A

Part 2

Date: Saturday – March 14 2015
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: Main Library – Meeting Room A

SCHA – Lunch & Learn: Spartanburg’s Medical Community in the 1920s and 30s

Join Susan Hodge Irwin this Friday, February 27 12:30-1:30 as she shares her insights from Spartanburg Medical Society’s archives. Mrs. Irwin is a native of Spartanburg and a graduate of Smith College, University of Michigan, and Duke University. She was an international banker in New York City before returning to Spartanburg in 2001. She is recently retired from USC Upstate where she worked in fundraising, development, and archives.

Lunch & Learns are held in the Callie and John Rainey Conference Room in the west wing of Chapman Cultural Center.

Catered lunches will be available through Palmetto Palate, reserved in advance through our gift shop. Tickets and a limited number of lunches will be available at the door.

$5/ticket only; FREE/SCHA Members

$15/ticket and sandwich or salad box (includes beverage and dessert)

Reserve tickets by clicking here or by calling Spartanburg Regional History Museum at (864) 596-3501 Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Buster Keaton’s silent comedy “The Cameraman” – a free Chautauqua classic film and discussion

Saturday February 28 at 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm FREE

Chase away your winter doldrums with Buster Keaton’s comic masterpiece. This silent film will be accompanied by LIVE MUSIC just as it was when first premiered in 1928. Laugh with a LIVE AUDIENCE. You’re not going to believe a movie can be this funny without talking. You’ll laugh until you cry. You don’t want to miss the monkey.

Discussion led by Dr. Scott Henderson of Furman University. A movie buff, Dr. Henderson has taught courses on the origins and rise of the American film industry. His grandfather, C. Russell Henderson Sr., began his professional career as a piano player for silent movies during the 1920s. Dr. Henderson has a BA in history and international affairs; an MA and PhD in history.

Movie and discussion will be held at Greenville Tech UT Bldg 104 remodeled movie-style auditorium with large screen and comfortable seating. (506 S. Pleasantburg, Greenville, SC 29607)

Info:  greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org or 864.244.1499

CANCELLED – Time and Life of Jim

Tonight’s Meeting Has Been Canceled
due to weather. Will update you with rescheduled date. Thanks and be safe!

Speaker, Clyde Carr

*Meeting will be Tues, Feb 24th 7pm @ TR City Hall      

Join us as we hear Clyde Carr tell us the interesting story of how “Jim”, later known as Rev. James R. Rosemond, founded more than 50 churches in the upstate.

This program is free and open to the public.

PICKENS COUNTY YOUTH ARTS 2015

The Pickens County Cultural Commission is pleased to announce that, in recognition of “National Youth Arts” month as well as “National Music in our Schools” month, March is again, Pickens County Youth Arts Month. The Pickens County Museum of Art & History and the Schools of Pickens County will celebrate with a reception for Parents and Students on Saturday March 7, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

For the safety and comfort of our visitors, the reception is broken into three categories. We encourage family to visit during the time frame most appropriate for your child.

 Elementary Schools will be celebrating from 10:00 a.m. until noon. A special “thank you” presentation to elementary schools will occur at 11:30 a.m.

 Middle Schools will be the highlight from Noon to 1:30 p.m. with a Middle Schools Award Ceremony at 1:00 p.m.

 High School kudos will cap off the day from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m. with the High School Awards Ceremony taking place at2:30 p.m.

In addition to the always entertaining Visual Arts Exhibition, which will be on display beginning February 28 and continuing through March 26, the School District of Pickens County will be hosting a selection of other exhibits, concerts and performances taking place at a variety of locations throughout March. As the many schools sponsoring events are too numerous to add here, please do contact your child’s school for more programming information.

“Pickens County Youth Arts 2015” is sponsored in part by: Pickens Savings & Loan, South State Bank, andRobinson Funeral Home, Crematory & Memorial Gardens. The Pickens County Museum of Art & History is funded in part by Pickens County, members and friends of the museum and a grant from the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Located at the corner of Hwy. 178 at 307 Johnson Street in Pickens SC, the museum is open Tuesdays,Wednesdays and Fridays from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. until 7:30 p.m. and Saturdaysfrom 9:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Admission is free but donations are welcomed.

For this and many more events, please check out www.VisitPickensCounty.com/Calendar or contact the museum at(864) 898-5963.

Hagood Mill offers Homesteading classes for the 2015 season

Homesteading is a lifestyle of self-sufficiency. It is characterized by subsistence agriculture, home preservation of foodstuffs, and it may or may not also involve the small scale production of textiles, clothing, and craftwork for household use or sale.  This year’s classes will be taught by Eliza A.H. Lord.

Born in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, Eliza A. H. Lord’s roots in this area go back for generations. She’s a certified permaculturist, SC Master Gardener, and Upstate SC Master Naturalist. She founded the SC Upstate Permaculture Society, now with over 600 members. For years, her downtown Greenville urban farm has held popular open houses with its lawn-free edible landscaping, chickens, mushrooms, and bees. In addition to consulting, teaching classes, and writing for various publications, Eliza also maintains a permaculture “how-to” blog called Appalachian Feet. She currently has a full roster of hands-on garden and homesteading classes available for 2015.

Advanced registration is required (at least one week before the start date of the class) unless approved by Hagood Mill staff and Instructor. Students can register online at www.visitpickenscounty.com/calendar  using a credit card or Paypal account or pay cash/check at Hagood Mill Wednesday through Saturday 10:00am to 4:00pm.  All fees will be refunded if minimum enrollment requirements are not met. No refunds will be made after start date of class.

Hagood Mill is located three miles north of Pickens off of Hwy 178 North at:

138 Hagood Mill Rd. Pickens, SC  29671

Phone: (864)898-2936

 

Class Dates & Descriptions
Old-Timey Kitchen Gardens Saturday April 11th, 2015  10:00am – 1:00pm

Learn hands-on about cabin homestead gardens and historic  vegetables, fruits, herbs, and medicinal plants and their common uses. Students will construct a small kitchen garden (a garden located outside the kitchen door) and plant popular foods from the late 18th through 19th century such as sallery, harty choakes, spinage, coarn, turneps, challots, and unyuns.  Discover homestead plants like perennial yellow potato onions and beautiful Native American flour corns. Many of the plants will be beloved heirloom seeds from upper South Carolina. Students will practice old-fashioned techniques to learn how the original organic gardeners fed their families before conventional agriculture even existed. Students will collect on-site materials for features like low garden fences and soil improvement. Compare mountain and piedmont gardening methods, especially how homesteaders dealt with steep slopes. Students of this morning class may want to bring a picnic lunch and also sign up for the afternoon “Basics of Homesteading” class.

Students should bring garden gloves, sun protection, water bottles, and snacks.  All other supplies provided.  No gardening experience required. Tuition is $65.00 per student. Class minimum 5 people, maximum is 12. Light rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

The Basics of Homesteading Saturday April 11th, 2015  2:00pm – 4:00pm

Come find out how to set up a homestead from scratch. We’ll compare historical and modern methods of every aspect of a working homestead so that students can find out what it really means to be self-sufficient. From building dwellings without hiring a construction crew to making sure a family has the basic necessities of life, we’ll learn through a combination of a guided tour and hands-on lessons. Students will be taught how to tell if land has a viable water source, which homesteading techniques are the most practical for this region, how to set up the major elements of a homestead, and how to plan for the changing seasons. The basics of buildings placement, tools, meals, livestock, putting food by (preserving), small orchards, and staple crops are some of the many skills covered in this class. Students of this afternoon class may also be interested in attending the morning session of “Old-Timey Kitchen Gardens” and bringing a picnic lunch to eat during the hour break between the two.

Students should bring garden gloves, sun protection, water bottles, and snacks.  All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $55.00 per student. Class minimum 5 people, maximum is 15. Light rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

 

Ecosystems on the Homestead May 9th, 2015  10:00am – Noon

Homesteaders in the 18th and 19th centuries didn’t have modern science to explain how the systems they lived in worked, but we do. They knew animal manure was good for the garden and spring houses would keep their milk cool, and now we know why. Come find out the science behind a historical homestead and marvel at the instinctive genius of these pioneers. We’ll learn hands-on through tours and small projects how homesteaders managed without electricity, modern plumbing, or fossil fuels and why those techniques were so effective. You may even decide to employ some of their methods at home for fun or to reduce your utility bills!

Students should bring sun protection, water bottles, and snacks.  All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $45.00 per student. Class minimum 5 people, maximum is 15. Light rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

 

Growing, Preserving, and Using Edible Flowers Saturday June 13th, 2015  10:00am – 1:00pm

Back when picking up a cannister of colored sprinkles at the grocery wasn’t an option, flowers were the logical celebratory food decoration. Come learn how to use nature’s edible confetti in both luxurious and practical recipes. We’ll be using seasonal blooms to adorn pastries, garnish salads, as a stuffed entree, and even in homemade pastas. Recipes will be sampled in class. We’ll compare modern food uses of flowers to historical recipes for sugared violets, rosewater, finger bowls, and more. Students will even take a short nature walk to find wild, native plant options that settlers may have used. Discover which species grow best in our area, where to get them, and how to care for them.  Learn how flowers were stored in the 18th and 19th century to protect them from mice and rats. This class will occur in the small cabin unless hotter temperatures drive us into the main building.

Bring a water bottle, sun protection, and snacks. All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $75.00 per student. Class minimum is 5 and maximum is 10. Rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

 

Paper Making Workshop Saturday July 11th, 2015  10:00am – 1:00pm

Did you know that paper was once so valuable that British law dictated the dead could only be wrapped in wool instead of linen or cotton (the latter 2 can be made into paper but wool can’t)? Americans of the 19th century knew how to make each fragment of paper count. This class will learn hands-on how to make paper in a variety of ways, including how the original recyclers turned old cotton cloth in to rag paper. The rag paper most of us are familiar with today comes in the form of the green bills in our wallets. We’ll also talk about the creative paper alternatives that people found when rags were scarce. Students will leave with their own homemade paper making screen and the knowledge of how to turn scrap cotton or wood pulp (even junk mail) into beautiful stationary. Learn how to add flourishes to paper such as natural dyes, embossing, and dried flowers. This class will be held outdoors in the shade on the Hagood Mill grounds unless extreme heat drives us indoors.

Bring water bottles, snacks, and sun protection. Students can optionally bring fully dried flowers and small leaves to add to their paper.  All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $75.00 per student. Class minimum is 5, maximum is 12. Rain or shine (we will move indoors in case of rain). Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

 

Growing and Blending Your Own Tea (Herbal & Caffeinated) Saturday August 8th, 2015  10:00am – 1:00pm

There’s no need to purchase herbal or caffeinated teas in South Carolina. Learn how to forage for delicious teas in our native woodlands as well as expand your tea chest through wonderful garden plants.  Early settlers quickly learned which wild and cultivated plants make the best teas, since true British teas were so expensive. Few South Carolinians realize that one of the first cash crops planted on our coasts was Camellia sinensis, the plant that black, green, and white teas are made from. They also don’t know that we have a northern version of the trendy “yerba mate,” which we will taste test and learn to identify during this class. It’s even caffeinated! Students will learn about dozens of plants, when to harvest them, how to process them for tea, and the best recipes for dry tea blends. We’ll also talk about the history of tea in this area and compare what the wealthier residents of the state drank vs. the mountaineers. This class will take place outdoors in order to identify and harvest plants and in the visitor’s center while we brew teas. Students will leave with a small recipe booklet, plant list, and their own handmade tea sachets.

Students should bring water bottles, sun protection, and snacks.  All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $75.00 per student. Class minimum is 5 and maximum is 12. Rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

 

Surviving on the Winter Homestead (all day workshops) Saturday September 12th, 2015  10:00am – 4:00pm

This hands-on, all-day class will teach students the basics of preparing for the winter on a homestead. Learn how mountain southerners in the 19th century managed to survive the winter without being able to drop by the grocery store or turn on central heating. The class will be a combination walking tour and series of small workshops, with an hour break for a picnic lunch (students must bring their own food). Workshops will include heirloom seed saving (including how to properly ferment heirloom tomato seeds before drying them), building a “clamp” (an earthen root cellar), winter gardening before the invention of plastic tunnels, identifying the best firewood trees in summer or winter, and putting by enough food without a modern canner (we’ll string “leather britches” beans and more).  Students will leave with an ornamental string of leather britches and some rare southern heirloom seeds. We will meet at the visitor’s center but the projects will take us all over the property.

Students should bring a water bottle, snacks, a picnic lunch, and sun protection. All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $100.00 per student. Class minimum is 5 and maximum is 12. Rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

 

Foraging, Cooking, and Preserving Wild Mushrooms Saturday October 3rd, 2015  10:00am – noon

Learn how to identify, cook, and preserve edible mushrooms in South Carolina and which ones are available in fall and winter. Students will learn how to use spore prints and dichotomous keys in order to be absolutely certain they are eating the correct mushroom. Learn which mushrooms have lookalikes and which ones are hard to confuse with the wrong species. Compare the passalong mushroom lore that homesteaders had to rely on vs. our modern field guides, internet, science, and other resources (plus, all the mushrooms we sample in class will have the stamp of approval from a DHEC certified mushroom forager). Different species of mushrooms need specific preservation techniques due to their consistency when dried, canned, or frozen – learn which methods work best with each mushroom and the best ways to prepare them for meals.  We will meet at the visitor’s center but the class will occur all over the property. Students of this morning class may want to bring a picnic lunch and also sign up for the afternoon “Historical Halloween Treats” class.

Students should bring water bottles, snacks, sun protection, a collecting basket, and optional picnic lunch.  All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $75.00 per student. Class minimum is 5 and maximum is 10. Rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

Historical Halloween Treats Saturday October 3rd, 2015  1:00pm – 4:00pm

The Scotch-Irish brought Halloween to America and the Appalachians were no stranger to this holiday. Learn how to make a traditional turnip lantern (pumpkins are a newfangled thing), find out the proper way to bob for apples, listen to eerie stories, taste historical “soul cakes,” and make treats like Irish potato “colcannon” and spiced cider in a Dutch oven on the cabin hearth. In case of very hot weather the cooking projects may be moved to a cooler location than the cabin. Students will take home their turnip lanterns and a printed recipe booklet. Students of this afternoon class may want to bring a picnic lunch and also sign up for the morning “Foraging, Cooking, and Preserving Wild Mushrooms” class.

Students should bring water bottles, snacks, sun protection, and an optional picnic lunch.  All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $75.00 per student. Class minimum is 5 and maximum is 10. Rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

Wild Fermented Foods Part 1 Saturday November 7th, 2015  10:00am – 1:00pm

Wild fermenting was a major preservation method before the advent of hot canning and is credited with improving digestive system health. Learn 2 historical mountain recipes using traditional crocks and one eastern introduction. Pound cabbage into sauerkraut, salt gherkins into sour pickles, and brew tea to make Chinese kombucha. We will talk about literal “counter culture” – how to safely store active ferments at room temperature. Learn the history of these foods and where they were and are common along southern foodways. Food will be prepared in the cabin unless hot weather drives us to a cooler location. Students will get to try samples of finished ferments and take home a printed recipe booklet. Students of this morning class may want to bring a picnic lunch and also sign up for the afternoon “Wild Fermented Foods Part 2” class.

Students should bring a water bottle, snacks, and optional picnic lunch.  All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $75.00 per student. Class minimum is 5 and maximum is 10. Rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.

Wild Fermented Foods 101 Part 2 Saturday November 7th, 2015  2:00pm – 5:00pm

We will continue with our hands-on fermenting class from the morning session. Apple cider vinegar was a valuable ingredient on the homestead and most people made it themselves. Make your own cider vinegar from local apples, create hot sauce without using any vinegar (mild and heatless versions also available to sample), and even make a cinnamon-spiced fermented beverage called tepeche from kitchen scraps. Learn the history of these foods and how to adapt them to your personal tastes. We will talk about literal “counter culture” – how to safely store active ferments at room temperature. Food will be prepared in the cabin unless hot weather drives us to a cooler location. Students will get to try samples of finished ferments and take home a printed recipe booklet. Students of this afternoon class may want to bring a picnic lunch and also sign up for the afternoon “Wild Fermented Foods Part 1” class.

Students should bring a water bottle, snacks, and optional picnic lunch.  All other supplies provided.  No experience required. Tuition is $75.00 per student. Class minimum is 5 and maximum is 10. Rain or shine. Students must be at least 18 years of age to enroll. Advanced registration is required.



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